September 2017, Day 12, Ishiura v Daishomaru

Whew. Ishiura ends a seven-day losing streak, his longest since entering the top Makuuchi division. Staying true to his style, he ducks low at the tachiai and quickly gets both hands on Daishomaru’s belt. Then he puts his head in Daishomaru’s chest and turns on the jets, charging across the dohyo with surprising speed. Ishiura earns his third win, and Chiyomaru sits at 7-5.

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September 2017, Day 11, Takanoiwa v Daishomaru

Set ’em up, knock ’em down. Takanoiwa handily dispatches Daishomaru to stay tied with the select group of three wrestlers who sit at 8-3, within striking distance of tournament leader Goeido.

September 2017, Day 8, Daishomaru v Takekaze

Dinner roll, jelly roll, sushi roll, why am I hungry all of a sudden? Sumo wrestlers train in falling techniques to prevent themselves from getting injured when they hit the hard-packed clay surface of the dohyo, and Takekaze executes a beautiful shoulder roll once he feels himself headed inevitably dirtwards. With the win, Daishomaru is the sole representative from the bottom half of the rankings still tied at one loss with the tournament leaders. Takekaze rolls to 2-6.

May 2017, Day 15, Daishomaru v Ura

Ura, man, that’s kinda not cool. Everyone knows your tachiai is a little weird, you don’t charge forward with full effort, and that’s part of your style. But today you literally stepped backwards. Granted, hooking under the leg of Daishomaru and swinging him out with the beltless arm throw was a nice finish. But your 11-4 record is going to mean a good promotion next tournament, and it’ll be interesting to see how some really top-notch wrestlers handle your unorthodox sumo. Good luck!

May 2017, Day 14, Ichinojo v Daishomaru

Ichinojo moves at a glacial pace, pushing out Daishomaru with the feel of inevitability. Both “The Glacier” and Daishomaru have earned kachikoshi winning records of 8-6.

May 2017, Day 13, Daishomaru v Takakeisho

That little smile from Daishomaru isn’t just because he threw down Takakeisho by the face. It’s also because he finally ended a five-tournament streak of losing records, picking up the all-important eighth win on Day 13. Takakeisho has a good record of 9-4 in only his third top-division tournament.