September 2017, Day 15, Tokushoryu v Kagayaki

Man, we’re getting treated to a plethora of great throws on the last day of the tournament! Both Tokushoryu (3-11) and Kagayaki (4-10) have terrible records, but that doesn’t stop them from giving it the gusto. Kagayaki seems to get the upper hand at the tachiai, steadily driving Tokushoryu back towards the edge of the ring. But Tokushoryu’s heels hit the straw bales and he digs deep to fight back. Turning to his right, he puts his left leg against Kagayaki’s inner thigh and lifts, breaking Kagayaki’s balance. Holding onto Kagayaki’s left arm with his right, and using a good underhook on the other side, Tokushoryu continues to press with his leg until Kagayaki goes completely over. Kakenage (hooking inner thigh throw) for the impressive win. Both wrestlers finish the tournament at 4-11, with Tokushoryu likely falling to Juryo from the M14 slot, and Kagayaki having enough buffer at M8 to end up at the bottom of the top division.

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September 2017, Day 14, Sadanoumi v Kagayaki

Sadanoumi shoves out Kagayaki hard, and they both tumble to the ground beneath the dohyo. A nice sidestep near the edge sets up the move, and Sadanoumi earns his second win of the tournament. Kagayaki only has four.

September 2017, Day 12, Kagayaki v Aoiyama

Whoa, whoa, whoa. Aoiyama, dude, that’s totally unnecessary. After Hakuho was chided last year for an extra shove that sent Yoshikaze crashing onto the ring judge (breaking his leg), I’m pretty sure everyone took notice that this kind of behavior won’t be tolerated. This late push by Aoiyama is egregious and unacceptable, and I expect he’ll earn a stern rebuke from the elders.

September 2017, Day 7, Takanoiwa v Kagayaki

These two don’t have any kind of history that I’m aware of, but this bout almost devolves into a brawl. The weapon of choice seems to be a massive slap to the face from both men, followed by charging with the head into the other wrestler’s nose. Great back-and-forth battle, won by a nifty move from Takanoiwa who pulls down hard on Kagayaki’s head just when it appears there’s a pause in the action. Kagayaki slowly climbs back up onto the dohyo, the red welts on his face testament to the battle he just endured.

September 2017, Day 6, Ichinojo v Kagayaki

Ichinojo isn’t usually one for subtlety, but today he surprises us with a beautiful display of perfect timing. Locked up in the center of the ring, Kagayaki tries to break the stalemate by reversing his right arm position, sliding it inside Ichinojo’s left. He’s hoping for either an underarm belt grip or at least some leverage to relieve the pressure of Ichinojo’s left-handed overarm grip. But Kagayaki has to lift his right shoulder up to create the space for his arm, and the instant he does this Ichinojo pounces, pulling hard with his left arm when Kagayaki is at his most vulnerable. Kagayaki goes flying and Ichinojo gets the uwatenage (overarm throw) win.

September 2017, Day 4, Kagayaki v Takakeisho

Takakeisho has looked solid so far this tournament – stable base, good footwork, hard to push around. But Kagayaki has his way with him and launches him into the stands with a hard shove perfectly placed in the midsection. First loss of the tournament for Takakeisho, first win for Kagayaki.

July 2017, Hakuho Yusho compilation

Yokozuna Hakuho wins the July 2017 Grand Sumo Tournament in Nagoya, earning his thirty-ninth top-division championship with a record of 14-1. Along the way he surpassed former Ozeki Kaio to set the all-time wins record with a mark of 1050. Over the course of the tournament he used eight different kimarite (winning techniques): yorikiri (5), tsukiotoshi (2), okuridashi (2), hatakikomi (2), sukuinage (1), oshitaoshi (1), yoritaoshi (1), kotenage (1).